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  #1  
Old September 9th, 2010, 04:54 AM
Katkoota Katkoota is offline
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Question Can I enlarge without losing the resolution of the picture?

Hello

I am new to the forums and relatively new to GIMP! Lest May/June, I started with GIMP.....drawing using GIMP's brush.

The template's original size that I choose (when opening a new white page/window to start drawing in GIMP) is 800 x 600

My question is, can I enlarge my final drawing without losing the quality of the picture (resolution for example)? How can I do that?

Another thing, if I decide to print my drawings on mugs/t-shirts ...etc , any idea what size (picture size) is best for better quality result (on the mug, T-shirt...etc)?

I will really appreciate your input. Thank you!

Kat

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Old September 9th, 2010, 10:16 AM
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Really, you're looking at creating an image that's at least 300dpi, and creating your image size at whatever amount of inches it would be, as you look at it on a t-shirt/mug/whatever.

If you're going to print on smaller items (such as mugs) you could maybe get away with half the dpi, depending on the quality of the graphic.

If your image is a vector (i.e made with shapes, using the shape or pen tool) then you can scale it up indefinitely without it losing quality.

If your image is rasterized (i.e made with the lasso tools, or the paint tools) enlarging the image will distort its quality. Even if you only enlarge it a small amount.
This is the same for flattened pictures and images you've imported from your hard drive, and such.


Without seeing the image, there's little more I can add, I'm afraid.

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Old September 9th, 2010, 12:03 PM
Katkoota Katkoota is offline
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Hi thank you for your input. I am really new at this- so apologies in advance if my questions sounded dumb.
What is a dpi? And how can I control it's size? Regarding the inch for t-shirt, it make sense now, so thanks

I wish I can post my drawing here. I tried when posting my original post, but I received this message:

"We are sorry, new user accounts are not permitted to create posts containing URLs. Please review our forum rules for more information."

Any idea how can I post the image so that u can see it?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Squibbit
Really, you're looking at creating an image that's at least 300dpi, and creating your image size at whatever amount of inches it would be, as you look at it on a t-shirt/mug/whatever.

If you're going to print on smaller items (such as mugs) you could maybe get away with half the dpi, depending on the quality of the graphic.

If your image is a vector (i.e made with shapes, using the shape or pen tool) then you can scale it up indefinitely without it losing quality.

If your image is rasterized (i.e made with the lasso tools, or the paint tools) enlarging the image will distort its quality. Even if you only enlarge it a small amount.
This is the same for flattened pictures and images you've imported from your hard drive, and such.


Without seeing the image, there's little more I can add, I'm afraid.

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Old September 9th, 2010, 12:09 PM
Katkoota Katkoota is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squibbit
If your image is rasterized (i.e made with the lasso tools, or the paint tools) enlarging the image will distort its quality. Even if you only enlarge it a small amount.
This is the same for flattened pictures and images you've imported from your hard drive, and such.
.


My image is made with the paint brush. The thing is, I free draw the graphic myself - because of that I can't draw big graphics. I just wish that there is a way I can enlarge (after I draw with the paint brush) without affecting the quality.

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Old September 9th, 2010, 12:16 PM
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Ask as many questions as you like

dpi is dots-per-inch. Basically it represents how many tiny, tiny dots make up your image.

If you have 72 dpi (standard web-graphic resolution) then the dots are relatively large. If you have 300 dpi, the dots are very small.
It's all to do with print quality.
You won't notice the difference on-screen, but you will when you get it printed.

As for how you can alter it, it would have to be done at the very beginning of your project. When you create a new file in GIMP, you'll see, under Advanced Options, X resolution and Y resolution.

I believe the default is 72. Just switch it to 300 (or more) and click OK.

Note that this will increase your filesize by quite a bit, so if you're not working on a speedy computer, be prepared for some lag.




To upload an image, for now, just paste the link into the reply box. No need to hyperlink it at this point


As another note, if you resize your image only slightly, it may be possible to sharpen the image back to [what appears to be] its original quality.

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Old September 12th, 2010, 11:11 AM
Katkoota Katkoota is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Squibbit
Ask as many questions as you like

dpi is dots-per-inch. Basically it represents how many tiny, tiny dots make up your image.

If you have 72 dpi (standard web-graphic resolution) then the dots are relatively large. If you have 300 dpi, the dots are very small.
It's all to do with print quality.
You won't notice the difference on-screen, but you will when you get it printed.

As for how you can alter it, it would have to be done at the very beginning of your project. When you create a new file in GIMP, you'll see, under Advanced Options, X resolution and Y resolution.

I believe the default is 72. Just switch it to 300 (or more) and click OK.

Note that this will increase your filesize by quite a bit, so if you're not working on a speedy computer, be prepared for some lag.

To upload an image, for now, just paste the link into the reply box. No need to hyperlink it at this point

As another note, if you resize your image only slightly, it may be possible to sharpen the image back to [what appears to be] its original quality.


Thank you very much for your very useful response. I guess that since I would love to print out my drawings, I will go for 300 dpi ^_^

Here is my very first drawing (free-hand-drawing) using the mouse. I will look for a web-tablet in order to give my hand better freedom when drawing than when doing it with the mouse.
Edit: I pasted the link into the reply box, yet got the message again

I will let you know how will it go with me ..I hope I do it right -with quality not being affected by the slight resize...

Kat

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  #7  
Old September 12th, 2010, 12:24 PM
Katkoota Katkoota is offline
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by the way, after completing the drawing, what is the best file type to save as? (I normally choose .jpg) but I am wondering if another file type will be best to save it?

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Old September 13th, 2010, 09:06 AM
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So long as you save in GIMP's native format (which is an XCF file) everything you've been working on will be preserved for further editing, in its original quality.
This makes a very large file.

When you're ready to post it online, saving a copy as a jpeg is perfectly fine, just make sure you use a quality setting higher than 7 (it'll ask you for this when you save the image).
The higher the quality setting, the better looking the image, but of course -- since the filesize will be larger -- it takes a little longer to download.
This is rarely a problem nowadays, though, since pretty much everyone uses broadband.

I'm not too sure how many posts you need to be able to post an image, but I'd imagine it's 10.
Feel free to post an introduction or something else in one of the other forums to raise your post count so you can post a picture

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Old November 1st, 2010, 05:02 PM
Wena Wena is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katkoota
by the way, after completing the drawing, what is the best file type to save as? (I normally choose .jpg) but I am wondering if another file type will be best to save it?


I prefer to save in png format because most of my art work will be layers in my animation work.

The png is the best if you have transparency in your work that is so that some other image will show through.

As this is my first replay to anything in this thread let me say I am amazed at what Gimp can do.

Wena

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Old August 21st, 2012, 10:25 AM
cool_jessica cool_jessica is offline
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It may be possible in photoshop or gimp if you open your image and a new page of the size you want. copy the image, and paste it as new layer, onto the new page, then rescale the layer to the size of your page I have achieved reasonable results this way depending on the quality of the original.
Thank you!

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